Mass Killing at Ohio Pound is Just One of Many Awful Responses to Crisis

The Franklin County dog pound in Ohio received test results positive for distemper on one dog on September 3.  The facility remained open and adopted out 67 dogs before finally closing on September 9.

Franklin Co has since killed 84 dogs due to “distemper concerns” and 6 more dogs “for unrelated reasons”.  Rescue groups who tried to save some of the exposed dogs from being killed, including mama dogs with litters, were turned away despite having appropriate quarantine and medical care arranged.  All while enabling the killing which, you know, is weird:

Misti Martin-Fuller is the executive director of the I Have a Dream Rescue.
[…]
“The staff who are actually having to hold these dogs, walking them down the aisle, and actually administer the drugs? They’re not at fault,” Martin-Fuller said.

The ones doing the actual killing who won’t let us save the dogs? Oh heavens no, not to blame.

Also weird:  Rescue groups went to a county judge to obtain a temporary restraining order to stop the killings.  The judge granted the order but is requiring rescues to post a $100,000 bond which they are unable to do.  The county’s response, natch:  we’ll stop killing if rescues cough up the cash.

Donald Winstel, who just took over as shelter director, wants everyone to know that killing is hard:

For now, he said, counselors have been made available for shelter employees.

“Imagine what it would be like to be the caregivers of these dogs, and then, in some cases, to be involved with the process of euthanizing them,” Winstel said. “We understand those feelings. We’re going through that, too.”

They understand those feelings and they’ve got counselors for themselves but locals who recently adopted dogs are having to find out from the news that their pets might be contagious, might get sick and that if they do, it might be serious:

The shelter is not notifying those who were recently adopted of distemper but they are providing care and consultation at no cost to people concerned.

And I think with that, congratulations are in order:  Well done, Franklin Co.  If only you’d been able to squeeze in a reference to the irresponsible public, you would have had Kill Shelter yahtzee.

(Thanks Clarice.)

Rowan Co Pound Gets a Million Dollar Donation and Totally Blows It

rowan co cat

Cat ID #A103582 at the Rowan Co pound, as pictured on Petfinder.

In February 2016, the Rowan Co pound in NC unveiled a new cat wing.  The $1.1 million, 160 cage area of the facility was supposed to be an enormous upgrade for cats who were previously housed in groups inside dog runs. Anti-microbial floors, an isolation area and separate ventilation systems for each room were designed to keep cats healthy. Donor Christine Morykwas paid the bill but she didn’t simply hand over the money and hope for the best. She demanded better care for the cats:

[…]Morykwas required Rowan County to adopt specific medical treatment and sanitation protocols.
[…]
[F]our full-time staff members and four part-time staff members who are specifically responsible for cleaning the cat wing [were added].

On August 23, the state of NC failed Rowan Co on its routine inspection, primarily because of the suck-ass conditions in the cat wing:

The inspection found feces smeared on the inside of cat cages, dirty and wet cage surfaces, a generally messy cat isolation room, a record keeping system that makes it hard to identify cats, peeling paint in dog holding areas and other issues.
[…]
In the stray cat room, an inspector found three cat cages that were “very dirty.” One of the cages contained a mother cat and five kittens and was streaked with feces and litter.

Upon seeing all the filth in the cat wing, the inspector asked when the afternoon cleaning begins. The director responded with a reassuring *shrug*. Another staffer offered that the inspector happened to be there on the only weekday when they actually have no afternoon cleaning crew but said the staff did do spot cleaning. The inspector, who was there more than 2 hours that afternoon, noted that she did not see any evidence of spot cleaning. In fact, no one bothered to clean up even the most egregious offenses the inspector was pointing out during the time she was there.

The fancy anti-microbial floors hadn’t been swept or mopped, apparently in some time.

There were no cage cards or any other animal records in the cat wing.  When the inspector asked to see records for cats under medical care, she was told there were no paper records as everything was done on the computer.  When she asked to see the computer records, the staff was unable to access them.

The Salisbury Post asked Rowan County Manager Aaron Church about the failed inspection and he issued this really swell statement:

“Summer brings an increase of animals,” he said in an emailed response. “This is our first summer with the cat wing and issues during the beginning are to be expected. However, we have excellent staff and fully expect that things will continue to improve while providing a service to the citizens and animals of Rowan County.”

Your “excellent” staff members are not doing their jobs. The “issues” are negligence and/or incompetence. In order to “continue to improve” you have to have some improvement to start with. It’s been 6 months.  How much longer do you need to figure out that shit smeared cages are supposed to be cleaned?  Did Rowan Co think the anti-microbial floors were going to sweep themselves?

The county manager told WCCB that the pound’s veterinarian, Dr. Robert Krawczyk, was fired on August 23 – the date of the failed inspection. He’d only been on the job for 3 weeks:

Church tells me the decision to terminate Krawczyk was, in part due to the inspection, as well as previous issues.
The termination letter (see pictures) accuses Krawczyk of “improper comments to staff and visitors,” “failure to properly document medications,” “failure to complete an assigned daily task,” and “lack of attention to detail in applying medical treatment and evaluations.”

Yes, he definitely sounds excellent. You know who else is excellent?

Church tells me he and Shelter Director Bob Pendergrass talked about the inspection for three hours today. He says, “Bob doing an excellent job,” and, “Bob is new to the position and we have a lot of employees.”
To be exact, there are 8 animal control enforcement officers, 4 full time shelter attendants and 4 part time shelter attendants as well as the director and the shelter vet (now vacant; the search for a new shelter vet is already underway, says Church.).

Oh man, it’s a hard job.  I feel sooooooooo sorry for people who have hard jobs.  It sounds like work.  Oh the humanity!  Somehow, presumably during the never ending toil of hard labor and beneath a sweaty brow, the director managed a response:

Pendergrass sent me a statement today, that says, “The purpose of the state inspections is to help us be aware of and address any issues that their experience reveals during the inspection so that we can to do a better job. Staff is meeting internally and working hard to come up with a plan to address those concerns with a plan of action. We have a great staff and will make sure that they are addressed thoroughly.”

Great staff? Why I’ve heard they’re excellent!

But let’s get one thing straight, bub:  The purpose of the state inspections is not to babysit you and remind you to wash your hands before dinner and make your bed.  The purpose of the state inspections is to hold you accountable – to reassure taxpayers that you are at least meeting the bare minimum standards required to prevent you from being shut down.  You failed.  You should be exceeding these rock bottom minimums by a mile – because it’s your job.

Three days after the failed inspection, the Salisbury Post published a piece from the Rowan Co pound director.  In it, he perpetuates the long debunked myth of pet overpopulation and touts his facility’s “outstanding record” which you know, long live irony.

And since we have just enough room left for one more enabler, enter County Commissioner Craig Pierce:

Despite the improvements, he said county officials “aren’t sitting on our laurels” and continue to pursue animal-related policy changes. The alternative, he said, is for the Rowan County Animal Shelter to euthanize a larger percentage of its animals.

“If all we had to do was euthanize the animals, we could have the cleanest shelter ever,” Pierce said.

Oh dear.  Maybe you should just go sit on your laurels.  In that corner over there.  No waaaaay over there.  Keep going.  I’ll tell you when to stop.

Ms. Morykwas is not pleased:

“Just like you can lead a horse to water, you give these people a million-dollar cat wing, and they still can’t do it right,” she said in an interview with the Salisbury Post. “I don’t regret it, but I’m saddened by what’s going on. It would convince me not to invest anything else.”

[…]

“There just needs to be a complete overhaul,” she said. “Maybe one of these centuries, we will finally get someone in there that knows what they’re doing.”

Rowan Co is not committed to lifesaving.  Taxpayers need to demand better – starting with their county officials all the way down to part-time shelter staff.  It takes a special kind of incompetence to completely screw up a million dollar donation in a matter of months (or weeks, in the vet’s case).  I’d hate to think what these people are capable of over the long term – and what their enablers are capable of attempting to justify.

(Thanks Lisa.)

New MAS Director Writes “I approve humane euthanasia for this pet” an Awful Lot

Below are some of the many pets killed at the Memphis pound on July 12, 2016.  The complete records, as provided by the city via FOIA request, can be found here (part 1) and here (part two).

This is one of four kittens who lived at MAS for a week. Records indicate the kittens were housed in FERAL 01, were eating cat food well and would sleep together in a pile. There are no notes indicating any of the kittens were sick, malnourished, or losing weight. All four were killed on July 12 when MAS suddenly determined, after they’d been apparently thriving for a week, they were too young to survive.  Oops?:

mas kitten too young

This cat’s intake condition was listed as “injured” on July 7 but there are no notes that any veterinary care – even an examination – was ever provided. It’s unclear if he truly was injured.  Romeo was killed for “time/space” on July 12.  Oops?:

mas cat time

Kitten ID 288617 was part of a litter surrendered to MAS.  The family was housed in cage number ER 04:

mas 288617 card

All the kittens’ medical notes are identical and were presumably copied and pasted into each individual record on July 9:

mas 288617 med

The family was killed on July 12 because three of the kittens had colds:

mas 288617 kill

This would appear to be the kittens’ mother, Mona.  Her record indicates she was housed in cage number ER 04, with her litter:

mas mona card

MAS provided no medical notes for Mona so presumably, none exist.  (She was not the only pet killed by MAS on July 12 for whom no medical notes were provided.)  Mona was killed on July 12 for having a cold.  There appear to be no records supporting this claim:

mas mona

This is Molly, kitten ID 288616 at MAS.  She was housed in cage number FERAL 01, just like the kittens who were killed for being “too young”:

mas 288616 card

Molly’s age is listed on her cage card as 2 months. Her medical notes on July 9 appear to have been copied and pasted from records belonging to Mona’s litter of kittens who were described as newborns and housed in ER 04. Note that on July 9, Molly’s apparently incorrect notes state she has a cold but on July 10, “none noted” appears next to URTI, seeming to reaffirm that Molly was indeed healthy:

mas 288616 med

Molly, who was apparently healthy and whose records appear to contain notes from a different litter of kittens, was killed for having a cold on July 12.  Oops?:

mas kitten 288616

These are two of four pups who were killed despite having a rescue offer to take them after MAS determined they had been exposed to parvo. Note that their “outcome” indicates “transfer – rescue”.  Oops?:

rescue pup mas
rescue pup2 mas

Local animal advocates report that the Memphis pound has never once filled all of its roughly 550 cages since its opening several years ago. There are always many empty cages at MAS, yet animals are still killed for space which, like the overwhelming majority of killings at MAS, seems to make no sense.

In the fall, MAS will reportedly bring in Target Zero, a group which has targeted and created zero no kill communities and which advocates for dumping lost cats lacking identification back on the streets instead of sheltering them. Afterward, MAS will reportedly adopt a plan to continue killing pets for time/space (or not) for another 3 years before ending the practice. Killing for being too young/or not, having a cold/or not, being injured/or not and for having a rescue on the way will continue forever, I guess, since none of these excuses are being addressed by the new director.  And in fact, she’s signing off on them left and right.

Look, I don’t know if some or all of the animals killed by MAS on July 12 were killed by mistake. Maybe some or all were killed intentionally – despite being healthy or in some cases, treatable, despite cage space being available, despite having rescue on the way – whatever. What I do know is that killing shelter pets is wrong.

Euthanasia to end the suffering of medically hopeless pets who have been given a poor/grave prognosis by a veterinarian is something completely different than killing. It’s part of animal sheltering – a very small part. Words matter. Attempting to whitewash the needless killing, by mistake or by design, of healthy/treatable pets by referring to it as “humane euthanasia” is wrong.

The main focus of any animal shelter should be lifesaving – immediate and responsible lifesaving. If that is ever to be the focus at MAS, it must start with a director immediately and responsibly committed to it. It appears that MAS, as ever, is lacking in this area.

Some in Memphis want to excuse the new director’s killing by claiming “these things take time”. To my mind, that is nothing more than enabling the behavior. I don’t need to wait and see how many more animals MAS puts into the dumpster over the next three months, three years or three anything. Molly is too many. Mona is too many. Romeo is too many. Every pet at MAS who is left to die in his cage or is killed under the guise of “humane euthanasia” when he isn’t medically hopeless and suffering is too many.

How many more, Memphis?

(Thanks Lou Ann.)

Louisiana Public Shelter Refuses to Shelter Animals

So you have a job and get a paycheck but when it comes to actually doing your jobthat’s optional, apparently.  I wish someone would have mentioned this to me sooner!

Parish animal control workers recently refused a deputy’s order to pick up dogs in a cruelty case, according to the Livingston Parish Sheriff’s Office.

And in case anyone was thinking that maybe the animals weren’t in bad shape, wrong.  Nine dogs and an unknown number of cats were living with a woman in a mobile home.  One dog had a broken back and was paralyzed, another had large tumors all over the belly, and a third appeared to have had the area from his inside thigh to his hip “cut by a filet knife.” The stench of urine and feces inside the home was overwhelming. The woman received a misdemeanor summons for animal cruelty and failing to provide veterinary care.

“Deputy [Philip] Lint then contacted the Livingston Parish Animal Control via phone and advised (the woman who answered) of the current situation and the condition of two dogs,” according to the deputy’s report. “Deputy Lint was advised by that female that it is the responsibility of the dog owner to ensure the dogs are taken to the veterinarian to get proper treatment. The dogs were left on the scene.”

Take your filleted dog and shove it, I guess. Of course this sort of blatant dereliction of duty does not occur without enablers in high places:

Parish President Layton Ricks said his employees have the authority to ignore a deputy’s order to rescue if there is reason to believe that the person cited had previously tried to give the animals up.

Right. That makes sense.  To someone, in some sphere of reality, presumably.  I mean not on this earth in these four, puny dimensions obviously but somewhere, out there.

Ricks said animal control assistant Desiree Green had previously received a call from a woman she believed to be the same person cited April 2 for cruelty. According to Ricks, the caller asked for help with dogs that needed to be put down because she did not have the money to pay a veterinarian.

When the call came in from Deputy Lint, Green “knew this lady was trying to get the dogs put down,” Ricks said.

Ricks said he supported Green’s decision to leave the dogs where they were. The parish cannot afford to euthanize all the dogs that are too sick or too badly injured to recover, Ricks said.

mind reader

Desiree Green in 2012, as pictured on the Livingston Parish News website.

I admire Green’s mind reading ability that she used to determine the lady who asked for help with her dogs previously and was turned away is the same lady who was clever enough to get herself charged with crimes by the deputy as a workaround. That should sound excellent on the witness stand.

Just business as usual in Livingston Parish:

Members of the now defunct Animal Control Board, or Committee, said the policy requiring a citation frustrated subdivision residents trying to cope with abandoned dogs.

Residents are “tired of watching dogs in bad shape, emaciated and suffering. People in neighborhoods are watching them die,” committee member Randy Stegall said in 2013. “If we hold dogs in the shelter until they are adopted, then it will be a ‘no kill’ shelter. We can’t do that. Too many animals are out there suffering.”

Heaven forfend we have a no kill shelter. There are too many suffering animals out there, holding out hope that some compassionate person will help them. We wouldn’t want to be one of those people. Less hope, more killing, rah rah rah.  I wonder why they dismantled the committee.

“If we’re offering animal control, then people should be able to rescue a dog and take it to the shelter,” Board member Phillip Woods said at a November 2013 meeting.

Uh, please define “rescue”?

So while the taxpayers are paying their public servants to jack each other off, can anyone help these dogs?  Because they need help.  I’m willing to help in any way I can.  If you are local and can offer assistance, tell us what you need.

(Thanks Clarice.)

Disability? I’ll Drink to That! *clink*

drinkingproblemThe city of Fort Worth hired a contract veterinarian, Joel Akin, to neuter animals at the city shelter.  Some of the surgeries reportedly didn’t go well.  After a dog he spayed died at the facility, the rescuer intending to pull the dog asked to speak with him but she says he refused.  A technician at the clinic reported that Akin was drunk on the job.  The city immediately suspended and later fired her for making “irresponsible and unfounded” allegations.

Cue the enabling:

Akin’s boss, code compliance director Brandon Bennett, told a local paper, “Akin had a disability that sometimes caused him to get dizzy and slur his speech but that he was a skilled vet.”

He’s a deadbeat dad who’s also gotten into trouble for assaulting and harassing people BUT, it’s a disability.  I hope we can get him a special parking space.

“He’d had a troubled life,” [Fort Worth assistant city manager Fernando] Costa said. “But not withstanding those problems, he appeared to be fully certified as a veterinarian.”
The I-Team found those problems included a criminal record for driving under the influence, public intoxication and police reports alleging akin was shouting racial slurs in public.

Akin reportedly posted a number of disturbing comments on Facebook while employed by the city, some calling on people to kill Muslims, others described as “suicidal” in nature and uh, some other stuff.

At a hearing in November 2015, the Texas Board of Veterinary Medical Examiners found that Akin was a “continuing threat and a real danger” to his patients and/or the public and suspended his license.  The city finally canceled Akin’s contract.  After the state vet board took his license away.  Cause before that, he appeared to be fully certified as a veterinarian.  With a disability.

(Thanks Clarice.)

Sadistic Ex-Director in Boulder City Now Comes with Extra Creepy

(Warning: This is disturbing material.)

Somehow, SOMEHOW, the animal cruelty case against Mary Jo Frazier, the former head of Boulder City AC in Nevada from 1996 – 2015, is even grosser than previously reported.

An ACO whistleblower had informed Frazier’s boss, former Police Chief Bill Conger, of wrongdoing at the pound a full year before any action was taken:

[ACO Ann] Inabnitt testified that Conger told her, “Well kid these things take time to investigate.”
“He just kind of patted me on the head and said he’d look into it,” she told the grand jury. “And I had to believe him at that point that he was looking into some of the things I was telling him.”

He wasn’t. Apparently the allegations made by the ACO didn’t interest Conger. Among them was Frazier’s killing of her own pet, Oscar.

ACO Inabnitt testified to the grand jury that Oscar, a dachshund who had been owned by Frazier and her now ex-husband, had been taken by Frazier and was reportedly peeing on Frazier’s carpet. ACO Inabnitt suggested to Frazier that she give the dog back to “his dad” since he was most likely missing his person and the inappropriate peeing behavior was a result:

But Frazier cursed at the mention of her ex and brought Oscar to a bank of cages at the back of the shelter. She stuffed him inside a cage and went to the safe where she kept the shelter’s drugs, Inabnitt testified. Then Frazier killed him in a manner against protocol, Inabnitt testified. Inabnitt said she wanted to hold Oscar as he died to comfort him, but Frazier would not allow it.
Frazier stuck him with the drug in his hind leg and went out for a smoke. Inabnitt stared in shock as the dog screamed, banging its head against his cage.

Frazier came back and stuck a syringe directly into unconscious Oscar’s heart, Inabnitt testified. Frazier let the syringe sit there, moving with the dying dog’s fading heartbeat.

Holy Monkey Fighting Snakes.  I do not even want to guess at what “manner against protocol” refers to.

Inabnitt told the grand jury that Frazier ordered that there be no paperwork on Oscar’s killing.  When asked about the drug log, Frazier reportedly said she’d simply falsify it.
Which leads to the next horrible thing:

Boulder City police officers told a grand jury the city’s former police chief, who quit amid the shelter scandal, didn’t want the case against his former employee made public.
Former Police Chief Bill Conger ordered Detective David Olson not to investigate why the city’s shelter was missing cash and missing narcotics, Olson testified.
Conger ordered that evidence taken out of the investigation paperwork, he said.

That’s some Grade A enabling there.

If Frazier was stealing cash from the shelter, that makes her a thief.  But if she was responsible for the missing narcotics, who the eff knows what might have been going on?  Was she torturing and killing other animals the way she did Oscar and trying to cover her tracks?  How many?  I can only imagine everyone in Boulder City who ever lost a pet during Frazier’s reign is now tormented by nightmares.

Mona Angelone is one of many local residents who blame Frazier for the needless killings of their pets. Ms. Angelone says that in 2013, Frazier chased her dog through the desert and shot at him more than a dozen times before finally killing him. She says her other dog was strung up in a chokepole by Frazier, hanged over her back fence until he was dead, then dragged across her driveway in front of her and her daughter.

Some owners are considering civil litigation against Frazier.

Now for your Moment of Reassurance:

The Boulder City community has taken steps to make sure this level of abuse by animal control never happens again.
“The shelter was closed for a few days, so the animal control officers could go on to training regarding animal cruelty,” said Jean Slader, who served as head of animal control prior to Frazier.

Gosh, if only someone had thought of this sooner.  But you know kid, these things take time.  It’s not like anyone who works at a shelter WANTS to kill animals.

(Thanks Clarice for the links.)

Louisiana Pound Employees Under Investigation by Police

The Ouachita Parish Sheriff’s Office is investigating allegations of wrongdoing by the director and three other employees of the Ouachita Parish pound in LA. The facility falls under the Ouachita Parish Police Jury:

Scotty Robinson, Police Jury President, says, “we had someone within the animal shelter come in and raise some concerns.”
Concerns surrounding allegations the director and other employees were using an inmate who had trustee status to work on their private projects, projects that the police jury’s attorney says are not allowed.
Jay Mitchell, OPPJ Attorney, says, “…constructed a barbeque grill…and also did some welding on some trailers Uh private trailers that were apparently may have been used sometimes in animal control work, But they were not owned by the parish.”

All four of the employees reportedly resigned rather than face termination by the parish.

In 2014, the pound killed approximately 63% of the animals in its care.  The only other online statistics I could find were from 2011 when the pound killed 60% of its dogs and 85% of its cats, according to a local volunteer group.  The group has a page detailing the thousands of pets needlessly killed each year at the pound along with all the standard excuses about how there aren’t enough homes, they “have to” kill every single day of the year, the irresponsible public blows, killing isn’t as much fun as it should be and smack in the middle, in boldface, is this:

ouachita parish enablers

Screengrab from a PAWS of NE LA webpage.

Oof.

So apparently this institutionalized killing for convenience has been going on for years, maybe since the pound’s inception, I don’t know, and it’s a total package complete with a band of enablers.  The director and staff don’t do their jobs to shelter animals but kill them instead while the volunteers stand ready to defend the killing and blame the public.  Maybe no one has ever done their jobs at this place, I don’t know.

But recently, “someone within the animal shelter” was moved to take action.  Not because the place is an epic fail and the bodies are really starting to pile up, not because there are proven alternatives which could be put into place to save the animals but continue to be ignored in favor of daily kill-fests – but because somebody got a grill built by an inmate.  And there was WELDING.

Enough is enough, you know?  I mean killing animals hand over fist every day of the year instead of doing our jobs is one thing but getting a grill made and having welding on some trailers Uh private trailers that were apparently may have been used sometimes in animal control work, But they were not owned by the parish – well that’s just objectionable.  There comes a time in every man’s life when he’s got to take a stand and this is that time.

But do not fear, the mission endures:

[A]lthough down four employees, Robinson says it hasn’t seriously affected the shelter.
[…]
“Our treasurer office has kind of taking over the day to day operations as far as the financial and the money and things that go on.”

Things that go on. I dread to think.

(Thanks Clarice for the links.)

Shawnee Pound Gasses 3 Dogs Because It Can

The animals at the long troubled gassing pound in Shawnee, OK have been getting some help from area rescuers.  With a paltry 48 hour holding period, rescuers must continually scramble to get pets out alive.  They have reportedly been able to pull every dog at the small pound since May.  But that streak ended last week when the city gassed three dogs, one of whom was reportedly slated to be pulled that morning.  Tragically, the public outcry is being directed at the former owners (who may or may not be known) instead of those who actually killed the animals.

The Shawnee city manager, Justin Erickson, says the pound will, at some unspecified time, stop gassing and start killing via injection.  He plans to talk more about that next year.  Cause I mean, what’s the hurry, right? As for embracing the proven programs used by hundreds of open admission no kill shelters around the country, that’s a no:

“We are not able to transition to no kill at this time,” said Erickson during Monday’s city council meeting.

I assume that explanation will satisfy everyone paying for the shelter to not shelter animals.  If not, maybe local animal advocates can stop dreaming up Evil Former Owner fantasies and start pressuring public officials to do their jobs.  Or just let the city keep rescuers in continual crisis mode, with them gassing the occasional pet because they can, and enabling them by failing to unequivocally blame those doing the killing.  The more the city is able to distract advocates, the more things stay the same.

Let’s be clear:  Some shelter pets are lost.  Their owners want them back.  Others are in between homes.  It doesn’t matter who used to own a shelter pet or how that animal arrived at the shelter.  There is only now.  Now is an opportunity to help the animal, starting with protecting his right to live.  Everything else is a distraction.

(Thanks Clarice.)

Nevada Pound Director Avoids Felony Charges, Enabled by Police Chief

As we are often chided by those opposed to hearing the truth about pet killing facilities, nobody wants to kill animals.  And this is true, with the exception of everybody who does want to kill animals, especially those who pee their pants a little every time a box of Fatal Plus arrives in the mail:

Jenny Silvia, a shelter volunteer, told police […] that [former Boulder City Animal Control Supervisor Mary Jo] Frazier “finds joy in killing animals.”

Police were talking to people who had worked with Frazier at the pound while they conducted an investigation into allegations of needless animal killings by Frazier:

A frantic phone call [in April] had prompted a Boulder City police detective to investigate whether the city’s head of animal control had, just for fun, been killing animals in the city’s shelter.

[…]

Boulder City Animal Control Officer Ann Inabnitt told police that Frazier, her supervisor, didn’t want to provide medical care to Lotus, an abused 11-week-old pit bull suffering from shattered teeth, a swollen head and a broken left hip. Frazier’s reason, her co-worker told police, was “we don’t spend money on pit bulls and because I’m just going to stick her anyway,” according to the detective’s affidavit to support an arrest warrant. […] Frazier refused to put the pit bull on the veterinarian-recommended diet of soft food, records show.

The police investigation reportedly found that Frazier had personally killed approximately half the animals who were impounded by Boulder City AC since being promoted to supervisor in 2006.  She instructed staff not to advertise animals for adoption online.  The Boulder City pound was never at capacity and animals were killed while cages sat empty.

Most of the animals who were killed by Frazier were killed upon impound, in violation of the city ordinance requiring a 5 day holding period.  Another city ordinance requires an exam by a veterinarian before any animal is killed but police determined Frazier was routinely violating that law too.

After Frazier’s husband divorced her crazy ass, he says she stole his dachshund, took him to the pound and killed him.

The police investigation culminated in the issue of an arrest warrant on felony and gross misdemeanor charges against Frazier – a warrant that was never served because the chief of police, who is in charge of the pound, quashed the whole thing.  Frazier retired two days later.  She is apparently collecting retirement checks from the city and has skipped town, probably to a place where they have drinks with little umbrellas in them.  Little umbrellas that look like needles filled with Fatal Plus, I’m guessing.

Police Chief Bill Conger defended sweeping the whole thing under a rug:

The chief said that he himself showed Boulder City Attorney David Olsen the investigation and that Olsen said felony charges would not stick, though “maybe a couple of misdemeanors” would.
“Why go forward with something that’s not going to go very far, number one, and number two, when she resigned this whole thing stopped,” Conger said.

A leetle problem:  the city attorney says he never heard word one from Conger about the case.

Another teensy snag:  After an area paper published the story about how Frazier was allowed to get her rocks off by needlessly killing animals on the taxpayers’ dime then retire before she could be arrested, take the taxpayers’ money and go someplace sunny, taxpayers were displeased.  They began an online campaign, held a protest at the police station and generally raised hell.

In response, the police chief decided he’d kick the ball down the field a little, then fall on the pile after the opponent was tackled to make it look like he was trying:

Boulder City officials have reversed course, saying they will submit previously dismissed information from a criminal investigation of the city’s former animal control supervisor to the Clark County District Attorney’s office for review.

As far as Conger’s role in enabling Frazier’s escape from justice:

“People get in trouble and resign all the time,” the chief said Tuesday.

Chief of Meh.

Also:  don’t criticize, we all want the same thing, if you don’t volunteer at your local pet killing facility you are part of the problem, blahcetera.

rooster

(Photo by Casey Post.)

(Thanks Clarice and Jan.)

 

State of NC Finds Violations at Transylvania Co Shelter, Assesses Penalty

Last week, the NC Department of Agriculture issued a letter regarding its investigation of the Transylvania Co shelter.  The findings include:

  • During the period from September 1, 2014 through July 21, 2015, 205 animals were killed by staff members who were not certified as euthanasia technicians.
  • 81 stray animals who were neither seriously ill nor injured were killed prior to the expiration of the mandated 72 hour holding period.
  • The director was suspended for a month in 2014.  Upon his return, he falsified the kill log for 5 animals.
  • The records of more than 100 animals who were killed contained conflicting or incorrect information.

The state assessed a civil penalty of more than $10,000 against the Transylvania Co shelter as a result of these violations.

So all this sounds pretty bad.  But wait – we have enablers on standby!

“It’s important to note that these violations are administrative and have nothing to do with the way animals are treated at the shelter,” said Dr. Clyde Brooks, a veterinarian with Brevard Animal Hospital who led the effort to relocate the shelter to an improved facility two years ago.

This will surely be a great comfort to the 81 stray animals who were killed without ever being given a chance at redemption or adoption.  It’s an administrative thing!  Also the county manager says most of those animals were feral cats so piffle.  As far as why the director was suspended for a month last year, the county manager says we don’t need to know about that.  The vet goes even further:

Brooks doubted that the violations would affect [Paul] Vis’ role as shelter director, saying Vis has been instrumental in developing TCAS into a “state-of-the-art” shelter that has gone “from a 75 percent euthanasia rate to a 75 percent adoption rate.”

Let’s see if that’s true.

Nope.

Portion of the state of NC's 2014 shelter report showing a 44% kill rate at Transylvania Co.

Portion of the state of NC’s 2014 shelter report showing a 44% kill rate at Transylvania Co.

The county is currently being sued by the owners of a dog who was at the facility for a 10 day rabies quarantine but was oops-killed.  Apparently the owners loved their pet more than administratively.

(Thanks Lisa and Clarice for the link.)